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Fizza Malik, McMaster University Continuing Education Health Informatics graduate Fizza Malik, McMaster University Continuing Education Health Informatics graduate

Health Informatics

Where health and information
technology intersect.

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HTH 121 - Health Data Standards and Classifications- Winter 2020

Academic Credit Value:
3 units
Course Delivery Mode:
Online
Hours of Study:
36 hours
Course Prerequisite(s):
HTH 101 & HTH 120
Course Anti-requisite(s):
n/a
Instructor Name:
Dennis Cheung
Course Dates:
02/24/2020 - 04/26/2020



Required Course Materials:
1. HTH 121, Health Information Management II, Custom Courseware Reader. 2. Abrams, K.J., & Gibson, C.J. (Eds.). (2013). Fundamentals of Health Information Management (2nd Edition). Ottawa ON: Canadian Health Association. 3. Benson, T., & Grieve, G. (2016). Principles of Health Interoperability (3rd ed.) London: Springer. Book chapters are available for free access via McMaster library. Use the catalogue URL to download specific chapters: http://catalogue.mcmaster.ca/catalogue/Record/2718303
Optional Course Materials:
n/a
Course Description:
Understanding how data is shared and used across healthcare organizations is important in the planning and execution of any health information system. As improvements and increased efficiencies in the health care system, depend upon the collection, coding and classification of health data. It is important to have a solid foundation on the understanding of the principles of data quality along with knowledge and awareness of various data standards (i.e. HL7, SNOMED- CT, LONIC, ISO and the ICD-10-CA classification) and how they can be used to support management, planning and delivery of health services, research and education.
Learning Outcomes:
Upon completion of this course, students will:
•Explain the development of standards (including standards lifecycle).
•Recognize the importance of standards to interoperability and data/information sharing.
•Compare the components of Canadian healthcare classification, coding, and terminology
systems.
•Identify standard organizations that develop, maintain, and update key data standards.
•Describe the process in which data standards are created, implemented, and updated.
•Illustrate how healthcare data are collected, assessed, abstracted, coded, and reported.
•Estimate the challenges to interoperability and data quality.
•Distinguish the role of the HIM and HI professional in implementing, monitoring, maintaining,
and adherence to data standards and classification systems.
•Apply ethical standards and guidelines as identified by professional associations and the field of work.
•Apply group and team building strategies in order to complete course projects.
•Integrate project management principles for individual and group work activities.
•Demonstrate effective communication practices (verbal and written) for course activities.

Course Evaluation
The final grade calculation is based on the following components: Participation: 10%
Persuasive Paper: 25%
Individual Coding Assignment: 35% Group Assignment: 30%
Full assignment details and grading criteria are posted to Avenue to Learn.

Course Format:
This course is designed to present the fundamental concepts and theories in Health Data Standards and Classifications and promote the application to the workplace and professional practice. Course activities will include instructor presentations, required readings and experiential learning activities (i.e. case studies, group discussions, projects, etc.).
Assignment Submission:
Course assignments are submitted to the appropriate A2L Assignment folder by the specified due date
Late Coursework:
Late assignments will be subject to a 2% per day late penalty (includes weekends and holidays) for up to seven (7) days. After this date, no assignments will be accepted and a grade of zero (0) will be applied.  Extensions for course work must be approved by the instructor before the due date (see Academic Regulations below), and will be granted for illness or emergencies only. Students may be asked to submit supporting documentation for an extension request. 

Policy & Procedures:

Academic Regulations (Attendance, Coursework, Tests/Exams):

In accordance to McMaster University’s General Academic Regulations, “it is imperative that students make every effort to meet the originally scheduled course requirements and it is a student’s responsibility to write examinations as scheduled.” Therefore, all students are expected to attend and complete the specific course requirements (i.e. attendance, assignments, and tests/exams) listed in the course outline on or by the date specified.
Students who need to arrange for coursework accommodation, as a result of medical, personal
or family reasons, must contact the course instructor within 48 hours of the originally scheduled due date. It is the student’s responsibility to contact the Program Manager to discuss accommodations and procedures related to deferred tests and/or examinations within
48 hours of the originally scheduled test/exam, as per policy. Failure to contact the course instructor, in the case of missed coursework, or the Program Manager, in the case of a missed test/examination, within the specified 48-hour window will result in a grade of zero (0) on the coursework/exam and no further consideration will be granted.

*Note: Supporting documentation will be required but will not ensure approval of accommodation(s).

Academic Integrity

You are expected to exhibit honesty and use ethical behaviour in all aspects of the learning process. Academic credentials you earn are rooted in principles of honesty and academic integrity. Academic dishonesty is to knowingly act or fail to act in a way that results or could result in unearned academic credit or advantage. This behaviour can result in serious consequences, e.g. the grade of zero on an assignment, loss of credit with a notation on the transcript (notation reads: “Grade of F assigned for academic dishonesty”), and/or suspension or expulsion from the university.

It is your responsibility to understand what constitutes academic dishonesty. For information on the various types of academic dishonesty please refer to the Academic Integrity Policy, located at http://www.mcmaster.ca/academicintegrity/

The following illustrates only three forms of academic dishonesty:
1.   Plagiarism, e.g. the submission of work that is not one’s own or for which other credit
has been obtained.
2.   Improper collaboration in-group work.
3.   Copying or using unauthorized aids in tests and examinations.

Academic Accommodations:
Students with disabilities who require academic accommodations must contact the Student Accessibility Centre (SAS) to meet with an appropriate Disability Services Coordinator. To contact SAS, phone 905-525-9140 ext. 28652, or email sas@mcmaster.ca. For further information, consult McMaster University’s Policy for Academic Accommodation for Students with Disabilities.
On-line Elements:
In this course, we will be using on-line elements, which may include email, Avenue to Learn, WebEX, and external web sites.  Students should be aware that, when they access the electronic components of this course, private information such as first and last names, user names for the McMaster e-mail accounts, and program affiliation may become apparent to all other students in the same course. The available information is dependent on the technology used. Continuation in this course will be deemed consent to this disclosure. If you have any questions or concerns about such disclosure please discuss this with the course instructor.
Turnitin.com:
In this course, we will be using a web-based service (Turnitin.com) to reveal plagiarism. Students will be expected to submit their work electronically to Turnitin.com and in hard copy so that it can be checked for academic dishonesty. Students who do not wish to submit their work to Turnitin.com must still submit a copy to the instructor. No penalty will be assigned to a student who does not submit work to Turnitin.com. All submitted work is subject to normal
verification that standards of academic integrity have been upheld (e.g., on-line search, etc.). To see the Turnitin.com Policy, please go to  McMaster Academic Integrity Policy.
Course Changes:
The instructor reserves the right to modify elements of the course and will notify students accordingly.
Course Withdrawal Policy:
Policies related to dropping a course and course withdrawals are posted to the Centre for Continuing Education’s program webpage,  FAQs & Policies (https://www.mcmastercce.ca/cce- policies#Dropping).
Grading Scale:

 

Grade

Equivalent Grade Point

Equivalent Percentages

A+

12

90-100

A

11

85-89

A-

10

80-84

B+

9

77-79

B

8

73-76

B-

7

70-72

C+

6

67-69

C

5

63-66

C-

4

60-62

D+

3

57-59

D

2

53-56

D-

1

50-52

Course Schedule:

Topic & Readings (Links to e-journal articles will be posted in Avenue to Learn) Assignments/Graded
Components

Module 1: Interoperability Standards in Healthcare
Required Readings:
∙Benson, T., & Grieve, G. (2016).Chapters 1 & 2: The Health Information Revolution & Why
Interoperability is hard, Principles of Health Interoperability: SNOMED CT, HL7 & FHIR, 3rd edition. AG Switzerlan: Springer International Publishing.
∙Health Information and Quality Authority. (2013). Overview of Interoperability Standards.
∙HIMSS. (2013). Definition of Interoperability.
∙American Hospital Association. (2015). Why Interoperability Matters.
∙HIMSS. (2014). The Business Case for Interoperability and Health Information Exchange.
Gardner, Martin. (2003). Why Clinical information standards matter. British Medical Journal, 326(7299),
1101-1102. doi: 10.1136/bmj.326.7399.1101 Assignment 1: Persuasive
Essay

Module 2: Principles of Classification, Terminology, and Coding Systems
Required Readings:
∙Philip Aspden, Janet M. Corrigan, Julie Wolcott, Shari M. Erickson (Editors). Institute of Medicine Report
– Patient Safety: Archiving a New Standard for Care. Chapter 4: Health Care Data Standards (pp.127- pp.168) Publisher: The National Academies Press, 2004.
∙Abrams, K.J., & Gibson, C.J. (Eds.). (2013). Chapter 5: Clinical Classifications, Nomenclatures and
Terminologies, Fundamentals of Health Information Management, 2nd Edition. Ottawa ON: Canadian
Health Association.
∙Benson, T., & Grieve, G. (2016). Chapter 7&8: Clinical Terminology & Coding and Classification Schemes, Principles of Health Interoperability: SNOMED CT, HL7 & FHIR, 3rd edition. Principles of Health
Interoperability, 3rd edition. AG Switzerlan: Springer International Publishing. Participation in Discussion
Forum


Topic & Readings (Links to e-journal articles will be posted in Avenue to Learn) Assignments/Graded
Components

Module 3: Data Standards in Practice
Required Readings:
∙Hammond, E.W and Cimino, J. (2006). Chapter 7: Standards in Biomedical Informatics. Biomedical informatics: Health informatics, pp. 265-311.
∙Abrams, K.J., & Gibson, C.J. (Eds.). (2013). Chapter 6 & 7. Health Information Standards & Health Information Management, Fundamentals of Health Information Management, 2nd Edition. Ottawa ON: Canadian Health Association.
∙Benson, T., & Grieve, G. (2016). Chapter 11: Implementing Terminologies, Principles of Health
Interoperability: SNOMED CT, HL7 & FHIR, 3rd edition. AG Switzerlan: Springer International Publishing.
∙eHealth Onario., & Mohawk College. (2012). ON DI Terminology and SNOMED CT.
∙Abrams, K., Schneider, S., & Scichilone, R. (2009). Managing Terminology Assets in Electronic Health
Records. In Advances in Information Technology and Communication in Health. Participation in Discussion
Forum

Module 4: SNOMED-CT : Overview and Organization
Required Readings
∙Benson, T., & Grieve, G. (2016). Chapters 9 &10: SNOMED CT & SNOMED CT Concept Model, Principles of Health Interoperability: SNOMED CT, HL7 & FHIR, 3rd edition. AG Switzerlan: Springer International Publishing.
∙Bowman, S. Coordination of SNOMED-CT and ICD-10: Getting the Most out of Electronic Health Record
Systems. White Paper. Perspectives in Health Information Management.
∙Benson, T, & Grieve, G. (2016). Chapter 7: Clinical terminology. Principles of health interoperability: SNOMED CT, HL7 & FHIR, pp.121-133. AG Switzerlan: Springer International Publishing.
∙Benson, T, & Grieve, G. (2016). Chapter 9: SNOMED CT.  Principles of health interoperability: SNOMED CT, HL7 & FHIR, pp. 155-172. AG Switzerlan: Springer International Publishing.
∙Bronnert, June, RHIA,C.C.S., C.C.S.-P., Daube, Julie, BS, RHIT,C.C.S., C.C.S.-P., Jopp, Gretchen,R.H.I.A., C.P.C., Peterson, Kathleen, MS,R.H.I.A., C.C.S., Rihanek, Theresa, MHA,R.H.I.A., C.C.S., Scichilone, Rita, Participation in Discussion
Forum


Topic & Readings (Links to e-journal articles will be posted in Avenue to Learn) Assignments/Graded
Components
MHA, RHIA,C.C.S., C.C.S.-P., & Tucker, V., R.H.I.T. (2014). Optimizing data representation through the
use of SNOMED CT. Journal of AHIMA, 85(3), 48-50.
Supplemental Readings:
∙Giannangelo, K., and Fenton, S,H. (2008). SNOMED CT: An assessment of implementation in EMR/EHR
applications. Perspectives in Health Information Management, 5 (7), pp. 1-13.
∙Implementation of SNOMED-CT Needed to Facilitate Interoperable Exchange of Health Information.
AHIMA.

Module 5: ICD-10-CA and CCI
Required Readings:
∙HTH 121 Custom Courseware Reader: Fletcher, J. (2012). Chapters 1-3, pp 1 - 48: The Coding Process, ICD-10-CA, & CCI. ICD-10-CA/ CCI Classification Primer, 7th Edition. Douglas College, B.C.
∙Juurlink D, Preyra C, Croxford R, Chong A, Austin P, Tu J, Laupacis A.(2006). Canadian Institute for Health Information Discharge Abstract Database: A Validation Study. Toronto: Institute for Clinical Evaluative Sciences, pp 1 – 36.
American Academy of Professional Coders. (2016). ICD-10: The History, the Impact, and the Keys to success.
∙Walker, R., Hennessy, D., Johansen, H., Sambell, C., Lix, L., & Quan, H. (2012). Implementation of ICD-10 in Canada: how has it impacted coded hospital discharge data?. BMC Health Services Research, 12:149.
doi: 10.1186/1472-6963-12-149 Participation in Discussion
Forum
Module 6: Overview of HL7
Required Readings:
∙Benson, T, & Grieve, G. (2016). Chapters 12-15, 18, & 20: HL7 Version 2, The HL7 v3 RIM, Clinical
Document Architecture, Principles of FHIR, & FHIR Resources, Principles of health interoperability: SNOMED CT, HL7 & FHIR. AG Switzerlan: Springer International Publishing.
∙Quinn, J., & Beeler, G. (2015). HL7 Basic Overview. Individual Coding
Assignment


Topic & Readings (Links to e-journal articles will be posted in Avenue to Learn) Assignments/Graded
Components
∙Benson, T, & Grieve, G. (2016). Chapter 11: Implementing Terminologies, sub-chapter: When to Use HL7 and SNOMED. Principles of health interoperability: SNOMED CT, HL7 & FHIR, pp.218 – 219. AG Switzerlan: Springer International Publishing.

Module 7: Overview of LONIC
Required Readings:
∙Regenstrief. (2016). Getting Started with LOINC (Sections 1-9).
∙McDonald et.al. (2003). LOINC, a Universal Standard for Identifying Laboratory Observations: A 5-Year
Update. Chemical Chemistry, 49, 624-633. doi: 10.1373/49.4.624
∙McDonald et.al. (2016). Logical Observation Identifiers Names and Codes (LONIC®) – Users’ Guide.
∙Diaz, Brian. (2015). Why Do you Need to Map to LOINC? Group Assignment -
Standards
Implementation Proposal
Module 8: Overview of ISO Organization and Key International Standards
Required Readings:
∙ISO. (2015). ISO in Brief.
∙ISO. (2016). Country Codes – ISO 3166.
∙ISO. (2016). ISO Deliverables.
∙ISO. (2016). ISO and Health.
Helpful Links:
∙http://www-01.sil.org/iso639-3/codes.asp
∙http://www.iso.org/iso/iso_catalogue/catalogue_tc/catalogue_tc_browse.htm?commid=54960 Participation in Discussion
Forum

Module 9: Data Quality
∙CIHI. (2009). The CIHI Data Quality Framework.
∙CIHI. (2012). Data Quality Documentation, Discharge Abstract Database - Multi-Year Information.
∙Simon, Michael. (2015). Data Quality: the key for Integrated Analytics.
∙Kerr., K., & Norris, T. (2004). The Development of a Healthcare Data Quality Framework and Strategy.
∙Lin, B., & Chan, H. (2000). Managing data quality in the health care industry: Some critical issues. Participation in Discussion
Forum


Topic & Readings (Links to e-journal articles will be posted in Avenue to Learn) Assignments/Graded
Components
∙Chisholm, Malcolm. (2015). 7 Phases of A Data Lifecycle.

Module 10: Implementation and Tooling
Required Readings:
∙eHealth Ontario. (2016). Standards Selection Guide.
∙The Implementation of ICD-10-CA and CCI in Canada. Lori Moskal, CCHRA (C).
∙Barbarito et.al. (2012). Implementing standards for the interoperability among healthcare providers in the public regionalized Healthcare Information System of the Lombardy Region. Journal of Biomedical
Information, 45(4), 736-45. doi: 10.1016/j.jbi.2012.01.006
∙Tong, Gavin. (2011). Standards Implementation Tools: Maximizing the eHealth Human Capacity.
Helpful Links:
∙https://ic.infoway-inforoute.ca/en/resources/solutions
∙https://www.hl7.org/participate/toolsandresources.cfm?ref=nav
∙https://ic.infoway-inforoute.ca/en/standards/health-information/inventory
∙http://www.health.gov.on.ca/en/public/programs/ohisc/endorsed-standards.aspx
∙https://ic.infoway-inforoute.ca/en/news-events/infocentral-news/3165-standards-selection- framework-launch Participation in Discussion
Forum